Springtime in Sapporo

It is May in the city of Sapporo, the capital of Hokkaido, Japan’s second largest island. Often referred to as ‘Japan’s Wild North’, the name is well deserved, because although it has a lot of space, Hokkaido remains largely underdeveloped. Just outside the city centre, bears and deer roam free, and within an hour’s drive or train ride you can be in a totally rural setting, with lakes, active volcanoes, and snow capped mountains.

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A wild north it is indeed, and most people come here in the winter to enjoy the popular Snow Festival, and skiing on what is considered some of the best snow and powder in the world. (Being a Trini girl, I’m not sure exactly what that means, because I’d hate to think what would happen if I ever strapped skis to my feet, but it has made Hokkaido world famous.)

Being the tail end of spring, our plan was to rent a car and go explore Lake Shikotsu, about an hour’s drive from Sapporo, and stay in an onsen hotel right by one of Japan’s most active volcanoes.

But first we spent some time in the city, which turned out to be a surprisingly beautiful place, with tree-lined avenues, parks, and an almost Vancouver-like view of mountains every time you look down a road. It was easy to get around, people were helpful and friendly, and many places had English menus – all things that are hard to find in Japan. Unfortunately, the first day was quite rainy and cloudy.

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We stayed in the popular Susukino area, which is an ‘entertainment district’  (i.e. red light district), with loads of izakaya, bars and restaurants. We also went through the long Tanukikoji Shopping Arcade, which was mostly full of overpriced souvenirs, but fun to see anyway.

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Another thing that was good to do on a rainy day was to stroll through the Nijo Market where they serve seafood so fresh that you can literally point at, say, some oysters or scallops, and then the auntie will pluck them out, put them on a dish for you, and you can sit on the tiny chairs on the sidewalk to eat them with chopsticks. The Chinese tourists were really going full on about this.

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The next day in Sapporo I also did some obligatory touristy things, such as the Mt Moiwa ropeway – a cable car just on the western edge of downtown that takes you up a beautiful mountain to give you a view of the city. From the top you can see the Sea of Japan, nearby volcanoes, and all of Sapporo. My goal was to take the cable car to the top and then walk down on the foot path, but it was closed that day. FOR BEARS. No lie!

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Last on the list of touristy things to do was the Maruyama Zoo, which proved to be like all other zoos: mostly sad and depressing. We didn’t spend so much time at the zoo but the Maruyama Park was stunning. Everything was in full bloom, schools were on field trips, little groups of old ladies and gents were foraging in the forest for wild mushrooms and edible greens. The cherry blossoms were still blooming and though the peak was over it was still beautiful.

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How lucky I think the people of Sapporo are to have a vibrant city centre, but also so much incredible nature all around. In Tokyo you can sit on a train for two hours and literally STILL be inside the city – it’s that big. But Sapporo seems like a wonderful place to live.

Up next – the trip to Lake Shikotsu

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